How do we talk about mother’s day? at Positive and Promise

Cross-posted from: Positive & Promise
Originally published: 10.05.14

The older I get, the more capacious the significance of Mother’s Day becomes.

Yet this has very little to do with biology. For one thing, I am not a mother myself. In the most simplistic, Hallmark card terms, I identify as “daughter” in each relationship that is traditionally relevant to the holiday. Daughter, granddaughter, and, soon, daughter-in-law.

I by no means want to diminish these relationships; each is dear to me, and I will talk about them in this post. But I find myself frustrated by the biologically essentialist emphasis upon blood lineage perpetuated by this holiday. Women create exquisitely intimate ties amongst themselves, ties transcending and circumventing bloodlines. Lineage is not exclusively chromosonal. Motherhood, while important for its conceptual origins in biological connectivity, carries an even richer meaning when we widen the breadth of its reach.
Read more How do we talk about mother’s day? at Positive and Promise

CRIMINAL OR VERY ILL? by @anewselfwritten

Cross-posted from: A New Self Written
Originally published: 28.02.16

Was my abuser a criminal, a very sick man or both?

That is the question I am confronting right now. And while I generally feel I am an expert by experience as a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, I don’t instinctively know the answer to this question.

Logic, rationality, the thinking things in life can of course supply an answer straight away – he was probably both. But to jump to that conclusion without truly knowing why is lacking somehow. I need a bit more to go on; my education didn’t include the rigours of studying jurisprudence so I don’t know the questions to ask about criminality. My education also didn’t include any aspects of psychiatry or other clinical disciplines which might help the sickness bit of it (I’m discounting my biology O level here).
Read more CRIMINAL OR VERY ILL? by @anewselfwritten

SOS: Save Refuges, Save Lives

PETITION

 

TO: PRIME MINISTER , THE RT HON DAVID CAMERON MP

SOS: Save Refuges, Save Lives

Our world-leading national network of specialist refuges is in a crisis. Across England, specialist refuges are closing or being replaced by non-specialist providers because of funding cuts and poor local commissioning decisions.

We want the Government to commit to preserving the national network of specialist refuges and exploring a new model of funding and commissioning for refuges which supports a sustainable service and high quality care. Without refuges, women will have nowhere to go to flee domestic violence. This crisis will cost lives. We must act now.

Why is this important?

Two women are killed every week in England by a partner or ex-partner. These are the women who desperately need these specialist refuges. Last year Women’s Aid member organisations supported nearly 10,000 women and over 10,000 children in refuge accommodation. However, on one day alone in 2013, 155 women with 103 children were turned away from the first refuge they approached, primarily due to a lack of available spaces. From 2010 to 2014 the number of specialist refuges declined from 187 to 155, leaving many more vulnerable women and children at risk and without specialist support. Closures of specialist refuges will cost lives. Help us to keep these services open for the women and children who need them. Help us Save Refuges to Save Lives.

PETITION